Fall Foliage Great Smoky Mountains 3

Fall Foliage Great Smoky Mountains 3

Insane fall foliage in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. This incredible forest color was found along the Little River Road in October 2011. The Little River Road starts at the Sugarlands Visitors Center and goes west to Elkmont, Metcalf Bottoms, and ends at the Townsend WYE.

Cades Cove Panorama Smoky Mountains

Cades Cove Panorama Smoky Mountains

Panoramic view of Cades Cove from Rich Mountain in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park on a startling clear day in early Autumn!

Cades Cove Henry Whitehead Cabin Fall

Cades Cove Henry Whitehead Cabin Fall

The Henry Whitehead Cabin on Forge Creek Road is one of those places in the Great Smoky Mountains National park that is easily accessible but not visited as often and the other historic structures on the Loop Road in Cades Cove.

It’s always a great place to visit, but Fall brings a special beauty to the homestead that is unrivaled in any other season!

Fall leaf color Little River Metcalf Bottoms

Fall leaf color Little River Metcalf Bottoms

Simply brilliant fall leaf color along the banks of the Little River in Metcalf Bottoms,  Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Wears Valley Fall Foliage

Wears Valley Fall Foliage

Amazing fall leaves in Wears Valley Tennessee. The Great Smoky Mountains National Park boundary lies on the ridge of this peak. Everything on the “other” side of the mountain is within the park while everything on “this side ” of the mountain is privately owned.

Either way it is still a beautiful sight on a clear and sunny Autumn day!

Great Smoky Mountains National Park Wildlife

Great Smoky Mountains National Park Wildlife

Black Bear Cherokee Orchard in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park 002
Black Bear Cherokee Orchard 002

When most people use the words “wildlife” and “Great Smoky Mountains National Park” in the same sentence, it is natural to think of black bears. After all, the black bear has been an icon in the park since the days of its inception.

But there is more to wildlife in the Great Smoky Mountains than black bears. Nearly every mammal, reptile, and amphibian known in Appalachia lives here. Continue reading

Chimney Tops with incredible Fall leaves

Chimney Tops with incredible Fall leaves

Chimney Tops with incredible Fall leaves in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The Chimneys are one of the most iconic formations in the park and a hike to the summit is a rite of passage for many visitors!

Elk and Autumn leaves in Cataloochee

Elk and Autumn leaves in Cataloochee

Elk at the edge of the forest set ablaze with gorgeous fall foliage in Cataloochee in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park!

Caldwell Barn and footbridge Cataloochee

Caldwell Barn and footbridge Cataloochee

Caldwell Barn and footbridge over rough fork that leads to the Caldwell house are popular with visitors to Cataloochee in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Front Side Palmer Chapel Cataloochee

Front Side Palmer Chapel Cataloochee

This photo is actually the front side of the Palmer Chapel in Cataloochee Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The original road in the valley was on this side of the church. You can still follow the trace of the early roadway. The Ola post office was located a short way East from this spot.

Young bull elk in Cataloochee

Young bull elk in Cataloochee

Young bull elk in Cataloochee in a light wooded area in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Black Bear Great Smoky Mountains Park

Black Bear Great Smoky Mountains Park

A black bear climbing a tree in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Many park visitors miss bears because they only look at ground level and do not look up into the treetops.

Bears climb trees for protection and to feed on nuts and fruit. This is especially true in Autumn as the bears fatten up for their long winter naps.

Always keep in mind that black bears are wild animals that can easily outrun an adult human. Never approach a bear in the wild, never provoke a bear in the wild and never ever ever feed a bear in the wild. Feeding bears alters their natural proclivities and could lead to behavior that endangers bear and people alike.