Trail Info

Information about Trails in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Alum Cave Trail Great Smoky Mountains

Alum Cave Trail Great Smoky Mountains

Alum Cave Bluffs on the Alum Cave Trail Great Smoky Mountains National Park
Alum Cave Bluffs

The Alum Cave Trail in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park is one of the most popular trails for good reason. This trail offers more interest and rewards per mile for the hiker than any other in the national park.

Due to the popularity of this trail, it is often an adventure just finding a parking space at the trail head, especially in  peak seasons. The parking lot is used by both day hikers and for overnighters staying at the LeConte Lodge and the LeConte Shelter. Continue reading

Best Short Hikes in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Best Short Hikes in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

What are the best short hikes in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park? First of all, let’s clarify what I consider to be a short hike. A short hike would consist of a round trip of five miles or less.

Alum Cave Bluffs on the Alum Cave Trail
Alum Cave Bluffs

And just because a hike is short does not mean it is easy. Some of these hikes require a good bit of climbing and may seem a lot longer. But all can be easily completed in a half day plus whatever time you wish to spend at the destination. So here we go in my order of preference: Continue reading

Deep Creek Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Deep Creek in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Deep Creek in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park is one those out of the way places that is well known to locals but remains relatively unknown to the majority of park visitors.

That has always baffled me, because this little corner of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park offers more recreational and natural opportunities than any other region including Cades Cove and Cataloochee.

Wake Robin in Deep Creek
Wake Robin in Deep Creek

Here one can cool off on a hot Summer Day by tubing the area’s namesake watercourse – Deep Creek! In addition, the Lower Deep Creek Trail is one of the few off-road courses that is open to bicyclists. Continue reading

Hiking the Kephart Prong Trail


Kephart Prong Trail
Kephart Prong Trail

The Kephart Prong Trail in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a popular hiking destination for those seeking a gentle walk with plenty of interesting features. Few trails in the park offer as much in such a short span as the Kephart Prong Trail. Continue reading

Andrews Bald in the Great Smoky Mountains

Andrews Bald Azaleas in Bloom
Andrews Bald with Azaleas in Bloom

Andrews Bald is a popular destination in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. And for good reason:

The bald offers wonderful mountain views, brilliant Fall foliage, and lots of blooming shrubs in early Summer. The Azaleas and Rhododendron can really provide an incredible showy display when in peak bloom. The open meadow is large and allows views in many directions of mountain peaks and deep valleys. Continue reading

Goshen Prong Trail in the Great Smoky Mountains

Hiking the Goshen Prong Trail in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

One of the most beautiful hikes in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park is the Goshen Prong Trail. The trail follows the rushing and tumbling waters of Goshen Prong from the Little River up into the high elevations of the park.

Getting to the Goshen Prong Trail requires an easy 4 mile hike on the Little River Trail. There is plenty of good parking at the Little River Trailhead in Elkmont and the trek to the Goshen Prong Trailhead is a pleasant and easy walk through an old neighborhood of vacation cabins and along one of the prettiest rivers in the Park.

Goshen Gate Bridge
Goshen Gate Bridge

Once you reach the Goshen Prong Trailhead, a short walk brings you to the “Goshen Gate Bridge.” This bridge over the little River is not only an awesome piece of engineering, but it also makes for an easy crossing of the Little River. It’s a great spot to linger and listen to the music of the river. Continue reading